Skip to content

Three Things: The Mother Edition

2017 May 15

In honor of all of my fellow mothers out there: let’s all take a little lie down. For a second. Because, let’s face it, that’s all we usually get.

 

Barrington Watson, Mother and Child, 1958-59. Oil on canvas. National Gallery of Jamaica, Kingston, Jamaica.

 

David Graeme Baker, July Bride, 2008. Oil on linen mounted on panel. www.davidgbakerpainting.com

 

Mary Cassatt, Breakfast in Bed, 1897. Oil on canvas. The Huntington Library, San Marino, California.

 

Three Things: The Kid Edition

2017 May 8

As we approach Mother’s Day, let’s focus on the little folks who make mothers what they are: crazy people. Just kidding. But let’s give some young’uns some adventures, shall we?

 

Angela Strassheim, Untitled (Horses), from Left Behind series. Photograph. www.angelastrassheim.com

 

Holly Andres, River Road: Milepost 39, from The Fallen Fawn series. Photograph. www.hollyandres.com

 

Jeremy Geddes, Acedia, 2012. Oil on board. www.jeremygeddesart.com

 

Three Things: The Dog Edition

2017 April 17

This week, let’s study the dog. Here are three pooches to get your pen started!

 

Álvaro Sánchez-Montañés, Untitled, from Unprepared & Unsorted series. Photograph. www.alvarosh.es

 

Jasper Oostland, Pug, 2008. Acrylic on canvas. www.jasperoostland.com

 

Anna Ådén, Untitled from Midwinter Night series. Photograph. www.imable.se

 

Three Things: Dictionary Edition

2017 April 3
by Wren

Hi, folks. Wren here. We’re trying something new with Three Things. Hazel will still bring you her amazing visual prompts a couple times a month, but we’re going to switch things up and bring some non-visual writing prompts featuring three things, too. (Have other ideas for what we should incorporate into these writing prompts? Email us at hello@hazelandwren.com!)

Today, I’m thinking about dictionaries. I grabbed my nearest dictionary (The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language) and flipped to three separate pages, closed my eyes, and pointed at random. Here are the three words to either inspire or incorporate directly into your next narrative, story, and/or poem (it sounds a bit ominous, eh?):

hawk: n. 1. Any of various birds of prey of the order Falconiformes, and especially of the genera Accipiter and Buteo, characteristically having a short, hooked bill and strong claws adapted for seizing. See falcon. 2. Any of various similar birds. 3. A ruthless person who preys on others; a shark. 4. Informal. One who favors a militaristic version of his country’s foreign policy. In this sense, compare dove.

necromancy: n. 1. The art that professes to conjure up the spirits of the dead and commune with them in order to predict the future. 2. Black magic; sorcery. 3. Magical qualities: “the necromancy of female gracefulness” (Poe). See Synonyms at magic.

rim: n. 1. The border, edge, or margin of an object. 2. The circular outer part of a wheel, furthest from the axle. 3. A circular metal structure around which a wheel tire is fitted.